Sayerville High School Case Spotlights NJ's Landmark Anti-Bullying Law

JOHN MOONEY, NJ SPOTLIGHT

Alarms sounded after revelation of allegations that young football players were abused by older teammates

The specific word “hazing” is not in the state’s Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights -- one of the toughest such laws in the country -- but in light of the Sayreville High School football scandal, the landmark law is getting some attention for helping to bring the issue to the fore.

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Bergen County's Martin Luther King Jr. statue dedicated in Hackensack

BY JIM NORMAN, THE RECORD

HACKENSACK — Martin Luther King Jr., rendered in a heroic-sized bronze statue in a rough-textured finish, gazed resolutely from a black marble pedestal toward the northwest on Sunday, the Hackensack River flowing under a brilliant autumn sky behind him.

Hundreds of people gathered at a brick-paved circular memorial site on the Fairleigh Dickinson University campus amid the spiced aroma of multi-hued chrysanthemums to witness a white plastic wrap pulled from the 7 1/2-foot figure of the civil rights leader, who was slain by an assassin in Memphis 46 years ago at the age of 39.

 

 

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More oil trains heading to N.J.

By SCOTT FALLON, North Jersey Media

The owner of the state’s largest refinery is investing heavily in rail transportation to haul oil across the country to its Linden plant, ensuring that more trains carrying millions of gallons of volatile Bakken crude will be traveling through New Jersey.

The Houston-based energy giant Phillips 66 recently opened a new rail facility at its Bayway Refinery and began accepting shipments of crude in August. The company intends to build its own rail shipping center near the abundant oil fields of North Dakota and plans to almost double its rail fleet to 3,700 tanker cars to bring more oil to its refineries.

 

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Opinion: Here’s how we’d fix the Port Authority

Record Op-Ed by Assemblywoman Valerie Vainieri Huttle and Senator Bob Gordon

Bob Gordon is the state Senate majority conference leader and represents the 38th Legislative District of Bergen and Passaic Counties. Assemblywoman Valerie Vainieri Huttle represents the 37th Legislative District of Bergen County.

LAST SEPTEMBER, the George Washington Bridge remained gridlocked for three days in what would become an infamous and scandal-plagued affair.

One year later, as we continue to understand who is responsible and why it happened, we are no closer to fixing the agency at the center of the controversy, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

On Oct. 1, PATH fares will rise again. In December, tolls will increase to $14 for a single ride across the GWB. And the Port Authority is still known as a hub of waste and secret deals.
The Record suggested that the most important task remaining for the various investigative bodies is to learn the role played by the two governors. While that may be true, it is not the only job we have to do. Without a doubt, the greatest task before us is to reform the Port Authority.

Over the last year, working in partnership with key New York legislators, we have begun moving comprehensive accountability legislation through the state legislatures of both New Jersey and New York, as required to make any binding changes at the Port Authority.

In June, shortly before they adjourned for the year, both houses of the New York Legislature passed our bills — unanimously. That fact deserves emphasis. The proposed remedies were so compelling that when the bills went to the floor, every representative in Albany voted “yes.”

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N.J. lawmakers approve curbs on smoking in parks and on beaches

BY ANDREW SEIDMAN AND MADDIE HANNA
INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU

TRENTON - In addition to passing a budget Thursday, New Jersey lawmakers voted on dozens of bills, ranging from bans on public smoking to barring employers from asking about job applicants' criminal histories during the initial phase of the hiring process.

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Bills that delay moving disabled from institutions, halt transfers, wins final passage

BY SUSAN K. LIVIO
THE STAR-LEDGER

TRENTON — Both houses of the Legislature rushed to pass a pair of bills today that would slow down the Christie administration's plans to transfer people with developmental disabilities.

The measures would affect about 470 developmentally disabled people who are living in facilities outside the state, and require hundreds of others displaced from the closing of institutions to get comparable care in community housing.

Both bills will be sent to Gov. Chris Christie, who decides whether to sign them into law.

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Doblin: Parents of developmentally disabled adults aren't consumers

BY ALFRED P. DOBLIN
THE RECORD

IT WAS CHRISTMAS 1989 or 1990; too much time has passed for me to be certain. My sister was living in Ridgewood, I in Detroit, and our parents were in an assisted-living complex in Lakeland, Fla. My sister, her then-husband and my niece had moved from Lakeland back north earlier that year.

My parents’ health was neither good nor bad at that time. My father had some ongoing issues; my mom was in the very early stages of dementia. My sister wanted a Currier & Ives Christmas and arranged for my parents to fly up to New Jersey. I drove in from Detroit.

 

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N.J. bill limiting smoking in parks, beaches heads to Christie's desk

BY MICHAEL PHILLIS
STATE HOUSE BUREAU

The Senate passed a bill that would prohibit smoking at public parks and beaches on Thursday.

Smoking is already prohibited in indoor public areas like shopping malls and restaurants, this bill would extend those bans to some outdoor public areas.

 

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Bill delaying plans to move disabled from institutions OKed by NJ Assembly

TRENTON — The Christie administration would have to stop relocating people with developmental disabilities who now live in state institutions and suspend transfers of others from out-of-state facilities back to New Jersey until their safety and well-being are evaluated, under a bill that passed the state Assembly Monday.

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Assembly OKs bill to slow move of disabled

TRENTON – A bill that would put the brakes on New Jersey’s plan to move developmentally disabled adults back to the state was overwhelmingly approved by the Assembly on Monday.

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